That’s a Wrap!

Zero Tolerance 0770CF with a paracord lanyard Photo Credit: Kammi Dingman

Paracord is basically yarn for outdoorsy people. There is much enjoyment to be found in braiding paracord bracelets, slings, and knife lanyards. Having no prior experience, I looked up the directions and learned from videos on the internet. Paracord is amazing in that it can be used for shelter, hammocks, snare traps, fishing line, fish netting, fire, bear bags, and more. It’s easy to underestimate the innate utility of something so simple.

There are paracords that can hold 550 lbs, 620, or even up to 750 lbs of weight. A really interesting type of paracord is the SurvivorCord by Titan Survival Company that functions as waterproof fire tender, fishing line, and also snare building material. The flammable thread core burns readily, there is plastic cordage for up to 25 lbs of weight for fishing line, and hearty wire to compose a snare trap. You’ve probably seen the survival bracelets with a compass or flint built in, and perhaps some small tools such as fishing hooks and line hidden inside of the weaves of the bracelet. These are nifty to have, especially when you’re out in the woods.

A decent paracord wrap can improve the grip on your knife, especially if the knife is like the ESEE Izula. The ESEE Izula is one of ESEE’s most popular knives and can be purchased either with or without scales. It’s all personal preference. There are methods called the easy wrap, basic criss-cross, sword style, etc. Some knifemakers pre-wrap their skeletonized blades with paracord of the customers choosing.

Paracord can be knotted and used as an extension of the knife, especially if the knife handle isn’t very long. The snake knot can be used to make this extension. People have even used the snake knot technique to make strong zipper pulls for bags and clothing. More tactical and less tacky! Here is an instructional video by Blade HQ on how to make a snake knot lanyard!

That’s the tea! Thank you for reading and please feel invited to leave a comment and share this post with friends!

Kammi

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